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Google+ vs. Google My Business. Where to put your time?

The answer, hands down, is Google My Business.



Getting Found Online (excerpt from an article by @teamarchlea)
One last way to differentiate the two services is what comes up when you type in your business name on Google.

"If you only have Google+ set up, only your social network will show up, with your posts and number of followers associated with it. However, if you have Google my Business set up, you’ll have access to those additional business details on the side of the listings, from a full citation (Name, Address, Phone Number) to your business hours, to your website URL. Google my Business provides a far more detailed and comprehensive look into your business as a listing." Read the full article here.

So, what does this look like IRL? 

One builds your business, directly on the Google search page, where 60-85% of your traffic is coming from, while the other puts posts in the wasteland that is Google+. And, now that Google My Business has posts for all businesses, the information you post will show up directly in the search screen. 

Invest the time in Google My Business. It will pay off because it enhances every single Google search experience. 

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